To Get Started Please Click Your State on the Map Below:

United States Map

Washington Post Office Jobs Oregon Post Office Jobs California Post Office Jobs Idaho Post Office Jobs Nevada Post Office Jobs Hawaii Post Office Jobs Alaska Post Office Jobs Alaska Post Office Jobs Montana Post Office Jobs Utah Post Office Jobs Arizona Post Office Jobs Wyoming Post Office Jobs Colorado Post Office Jobs New Mexico Post Office Jobs Texas Post Office Jobs North Dakota Post Office Jobs South Dakota Post Office Jobs Kansas Post Office Jobs Kansas Post Office Jobs Minnesota Post Office Jobs Oklahoma Post Office Jobs Minnesota Post Office Jobs Wisconsin Post Office Jobs Louisiana Post Office Jobs Michigan Post Office Jobs Arkansas Post Office Jobs Louisiana Post Office Jobs Mississippi Post Office Jobs Indiana Post Office Jobs Ohio Post Office Jobs Pennsylvania Post Office Jobs Kentucky Post Office Jobs Tennessee Post Office Jobs Alabama Post Office Jobs New York Post Office Jobs Vermont Post Office Jobs Maine Post Office Jobs New Hampshire Post Office Jobs Massachusetts Post Office Jobs Connecticut Post Office Jobs Rhode Island Post Office Jobs New Jersey Post Office Jobs Delaware Post Office Jobs Maryland Post Office Jobs Washington DC Post Office Jobs Virginia Post Office Jobs North Carolina Post Office Jobs South Carolina Post Office Jobs Georgia Post Office Jobs Florida Post Office Jobs Pennsylvania Post Office Jobs

US Postal Service Workers: How to Avoid Getting Reported

US Postal Service workers are expected to perform their jobs well. Letter carriers are especially tasked with the very important responsibility of getting mail and parcels to their intended recipients. Other mail workers ensure that mail gets sorted and organized before it reaches the different carriers who bring them to their routes. Other positions provide the necessary support and logistical operations to get the job done.

The road to a US Postal Service position is not a walk in the park. You got to where you are now through sheer determination, patience, and grit. Scoring high in the necessary postal battery exam that you had to take and getting placed on top of the list among thousands of applicants for this same position was no easy feat. Certainly, you don't want to lose the comprehensive pay and benefits package that you are now enjoying by getting relieved from your job because of a customer complaint. Satisfying your clients is always paramount. The US Postal Service location you are assigned to do not matter. Whether you hold postal jobs in California, Ohio, or Indiana, what's important is to provide good customer service. Here are some things to consider so you can avoid getting reported:

Learn as much as you can from your training and orientation. Before you start your official duties, the USPS will provide you with the necessary training so you know what is expected of you. Absorb as much as you can from these days, ask questions if something is confusing for you, and be sure to apply what you have learned when you have started your postal career. By taking your orientation seriously, you know what the rules are and the behavior and conduct that is expected of you as a USPS employee.

Always seek to provide the best customer service. While you may be harassed at the tons of mail that you have to sort, organize, or deliver, always make it a point to give clients a smile or a friendly greeting. Whether you're assigned to the post office selling postage stamps or other products or on your assigned delivery route, remember that interacting with clients in positively is one of the joys of the job-and one sure way to prevent complaints. While it may be absolutely challenging at first, getting to know the people in your route by name, will surely endear you to their hearts even more!

Don't go postal-even slightly. The term “going postal” has been used in American slang to describe someone who has become uncontrollably angry, often to the point of violence. This is derived from a series of incidents where USPS workers shot and killed colleagues, managers, and members of the public in cases of workplace rage. Of course, the USPS does not approve of the use of this phrase. But if you go even the slightest bit postal, it's your work on the line.